Wildwater.tv's Blog

Video and Scientific Photography

Posts Tagged ‘special effects’

Two daffodils flowering – time-lapse photography

Posted by wildwatertv on March 11, 2011

This is my first attempt to embed a video on the blog. Stops it being stills only. These are two daffodil buds from my garden, filmed in time lapse using a Nikon D1x over a period of four days. Grow lights are used to fool the flowers into thinking they are growing in daylight. For some plants, the day-night cycle is very important. Luckily Narcissi will flower well under artificial light. Bowens flash were used to illuminate the exposures.

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Hover fly or syrphid fly portrait

Posted by wildwatertv on September 3, 2010

Extreme close up of the head of the syrphid or hover fly, Eupeodes luniger, showing the structure of the compound eyes.  My interest in these creatures seems to be growing, and I’m still struggling to get the absolute maximum detail available with transmitted light. The more I see of insects, the more I admire them. Stacked using 110 images taken with a Nikon 10x DIC objective using flash. Nikon D300. Modified Lomo microscope with a short tube.

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Microscopy as art

Posted by wildwatertv on August 20, 2010

A friend of mine, Julian Barton, suggested that microscopy could be used to produce artistic as well as scientific images.  Sort of landscapes within the miniature world.  There is a good history of this, with Spike Walker being represented by the Wellcome Institute at an exhibition recently of his electron micrographs.  This is my first attempt.  Greenbottles (Lucilla Caesar) have an amazing irridescent quality when you see them, and it is just about possible to reproduce this photographically.  These two pics are of the abdomen and thorax of a greenbottle.  I think I like the first one best, due to its cartoon like quality, but comments are appreciated.  Julian, I hope this is what you meant.  Taken through a light microscope using a Nikon 10xDIC objective with reflected flash light.

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Greenfly giving birth

Posted by wildwatertv on June 15, 2010

Now this is a touching and tender scene for anyone who isn’t a gardener.  It’s a greenfly giving birth to one of many daughters on a rosebud. Within ten minutes there were several of these little beasts running around their mother.  She, meanwhile, just sat there eating throughout.  Taken using a zeiss luminar 25mm lens with the usual flash arrangement which picks up the colours being diffracted by the wings.  When I last looked, mother and daughter were doing well….

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House Fly’s mouth

Posted by wildwatertv on June 8, 2010

This creature is the common house fly, musca domestica. When you see them sitting on a piece of bread they are using that fearsome mouth to scrape and suck food from the bread, cheese, or anything else they might like…  It excretes a sort of liquid enzyme which digests the food on the surface before sucking the pre-digested liquid up though the tube.  These mouth-parts are always a bit grubby.  Pays to keep them off your food in the first place.  Now I’ve seen one up close I think I’ll be more careful.

Taken through a light microscope with a Nikon x10DIC .25 objective and stacked using a stack of thirty-four images.

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Hover Fly eyes

Posted by wildwatertv on May 28, 2010

This beast is the common hoverfly, Melascaeava cinctella.  It has excellent vision, and extremely well developed compound eyes.  This photograph also shows the three small simple eyes, or ocelli, arranged in a triangle between the two enormous compound eyes.  Photographic image stack using a Zeiss Luminar 25mm on a standard light microscope.

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Female flower bee in flight

Posted by wildwatertv on April 29, 2010

This is another hairy footed flower bee (Anthophora plumipes).  There are lots around at the moment, but they disappear by the end of May.  This high speed photograph shows the opening of the sheath around the long tongue as the bee approaches a pulmonaria flower.   This sheath gets folded back as the bee feeds and then it snaps shut again before moving on to the next flower.  The male is shown in an earlier post, but this is the female, with pollen baskets on her hind legs.  Many of these are living in holes in the wall of our cottage.

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Hairy footed flower bee

Posted by wildwatertv on April 14, 2010

I spent ages last week setting up the equipment to do high speed photography on bees in flight.  Finally, I got this one to play and it took its own picture.  It looked a little odd when it came to identifying it.  I first thought it was a bee-fly, but on further investigation it IS a bee called the hairy footed flower bee, or to give it its scientific name, Anthophora plumipes. They have very long tongues, which can get to the nectaries of pulmonaria.  They are hole dwellers and our house has holes made by mason bees in which they probably live.  the females are all black, but this is the male.  They are among the earliest of bees, and only fly until about May.

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Another balloon being shot

Posted by wildwatertv on March 24, 2010

I bought a new Chinese air rifle yesterday for using in just this way, it’s pretty powerful and the pellet is travelling at 500 feet per second as it bursts the smoke filled balloon showing clearly the sound wave that is generated by the ‘pop’.  It’s so fast that the balloon still retains its shape as the pellet leaves the frame.  This is similar to another image on the blog, but with all new digital techniques.  Still looking to speed the flash up a little to freeze the leading edge of the rubber as it moves, but the speeds are unimaginably fast.

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Nigella seed

Posted by wildwatertv on January 22, 2010

This shows two different magnifications of a single seed, genus Nigella, known as love-in-a-mist.  The seeds are sometimes used in Indian cookery as a spice, and are individually about 1mm long.  they have the most extraordinary texture and a surface almost like crocodile skin. I’m working on a catalogue of microscopic images of seeds and this is so far the most beautiful one I’ve seen.  Zeiss Luminar, light microscope, Nikon 10x/2.5x Objective/photo-eyepiece.

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