Wildwater.tv's Blog

Video and Scientific Photography

Posts Tagged ‘eyes’

Hover fly or syrphid fly portrait

Posted by wildwatertv on September 3, 2010

Extreme close up of the head of the syrphid or hover fly, Eupeodes luniger, showing the structure of the compound eyes.  My interest in these creatures seems to be growing, and I’m still struggling to get the absolute maximum detail available with transmitted light. The more I see of insects, the more I admire them. Stacked using 110 images taken with a Nikon 10x DIC objective using flash. Nikon D300. Modified Lomo microscope with a short tube.

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More eyes

Posted by wildwatertv on June 3, 2010


Sometimes you take a picture which makes you want to throw everything else you’ve ever done away and just simply admire the majesty of nature.  I’ve posted a blow-up of the central portion of this picture to show the perfection that exists on such a small scale.  Taken through a light microscope using a Nikon DI 10x objective and using a stack of fifty images, this is a different sort of hoverfly to the one below.  This one is called Eupeodes corollae.  One of the most common flies in the garden this time of year.  Wonderful creature!

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Hover Fly eyes

Posted by wildwatertv on May 28, 2010

This beast is the common hoverfly, Melascaeava cinctella.  It has excellent vision, and extremely well developed compound eyes.  This photograph also shows the three small simple eyes, or ocelli, arranged in a triangle between the two enormous compound eyes.  Photographic image stack using a Zeiss Luminar 25mm on a standard light microscope.

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Shield bug

Posted by wildwatertv on April 20, 2010

This fantastic creature is a Green shieldbug (Palomina Prasina), Order Hemiptera sub order Heteroptera Family Acanthosomidae. They have long sucking mouthparts but they also have a gland in their thorax between the first and second pair of legs which secretes a foul smelling liquid.  This gives them their other common name, stink bugs.

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Hairy footed flower bee

Posted by wildwatertv on April 14, 2010

I spent ages last week setting up the equipment to do high speed photography on bees in flight.  Finally, I got this one to play and it took its own picture.  It looked a little odd when it came to identifying it.  I first thought it was a bee-fly, but on further investigation it IS a bee called the hairy footed flower bee, or to give it its scientific name, Anthophora plumipes. They have very long tongues, which can get to the nectaries of pulmonaria.  They are hole dwellers and our house has holes made by mason bees in which they probably live.  the females are all black, but this is the male.  They are among the earliest of bees, and only fly until about May.

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Compound Eyes 3

Posted by wildwatertv on November 18, 2009

This is the closest I’ve got so far to anything.  Taken through a Swift Microscope with a Swift 10x objective and Nikon 2.5x Photo eyepiece, this is the same eye as in the post below but this time it’s plain that the structure of a wasp’s eye is made up of hexagonal elements.  the hexagons are not perfect, but the shape of the eye determines the shape they can be at any one point.  Lighting was achieved by the use of a tracing paper diffuser held around the objective with a rubber band and encircling the head of the wasp.  I’ve finally nearly got rid of chromatic aberrations at this magnification.

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Compound eyes 2

Posted by wildwatertv on November 9, 2009

waspeyeblog

This is the eye of a wasp.  Unlike bees they have clean compound eyes, very highly developed.  The structure is a honeycomb of hexagonal elements, which combine to form a rudimentary image.  They eyes cannot focus like human eyes, but they can see in most directions at the same time, which gives the insect a clear warning when anything approaches. Taken through a Swift Microscope with a 4x objective.

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Beautiful eyes

Posted by wildwatertv on September 25, 2009

lacewingblog

lacewingdet

If there was ever an insect beauty competition, this animal would probably win it.  It’s a lacewing (Chrysoperla carnea). The green lacewing is a common predator of aphids, so is considered a friend to gardeners, but what is most remarkable are the eyes.  They seem to be made from some kind of iridescent metal, but they are just the usual compound types.  The sheer perfection of these eyes is fascinating.  Taken through a microscope using polarized light.

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An Eye

Posted by wildwatertv on September 7, 2009

Emma's eye

This might seem an odd image to choose, but I love the simplicity of it.  It’s Emma’s eye, and although the vast majority of the image is out of focus it does convey a wonderful sense of anticipation….

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A couple of spiders..

Posted by wildwatertv on September 7, 2009

meta segment1

This spider is called Meta segmentata. They are very common this time of year, and if you look under leaves by an orb web you will often see them devouring something.  In this case it’s a fly.  Spiders digest prey by first wrapping them in silk and then injecting them with enzymes.  the resulting meal is more of a soup than a meat dish.

Araneus1

And this one is called Araneus Diadematus.  As with the meta they are very common in the autumn and can get to quite a size.  This one is female and still fairly small.  You can see that all spiders have eight eyes, though in some, such as the Lycosids (wolf spiders) two are far more pronounced than the rest.

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