Wildwater.tv's Blog

Video and Scientific Photography

Wicker Man Oxford

Posted by wildwatertv on March 11, 2011

One week left for the wicker man entries to be completed and returned. This is the first of a series of films about the 2011 project.

visit http://wickermanoxford.co.uk/ for more information

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Two daffodils flowering – time-lapse photography

Posted by wildwatertv on March 11, 2011

This is my first attempt to embed a video on the blog. Stops it being stills only. These are two daffodil buds from my garden, filmed in time lapse using a Nikon D1x over a period of four days. Grow lights are used to fool the flowers into thinking they are growing in daylight. For some plants, the day-night cycle is very important. Luckily Narcissi will flower well under artificial light. Bowens flash were used to illuminate the exposures.

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The burning of the Wicker Man in Oxford

Posted by wildwatertv on November 8, 2010

This amazing creation is by Dan Barton, an Oxfordshire artist.  It’s a wicker man, burnt at the Oxford round table fireworks display in Headington.  For more information about this venture go to http://wickermanoxford.co.uk/

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Hover fly or syrphid fly portrait

Posted by wildwatertv on September 3, 2010

Extreme close up of the head of the syrphid or hover fly, Eupeodes luniger, showing the structure of the compound eyes.  My interest in these creatures seems to be growing, and I’m still struggling to get the absolute maximum detail available with transmitted light. The more I see of insects, the more I admire them. Stacked using 110 images taken with a Nikon 10x DIC objective using flash. Nikon D300. Modified Lomo microscope with a short tube.

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Microscopy as art

Posted by wildwatertv on August 20, 2010

A friend of mine, Julian Barton, suggested that microscopy could be used to produce artistic as well as scientific images.  Sort of landscapes within the miniature world.  There is a good history of this, with Spike Walker being represented by the Wellcome Institute at an exhibition recently of his electron micrographs.  This is my first attempt.  Greenbottles (Lucilla Caesar) have an amazing irridescent quality when you see them, and it is just about possible to reproduce this photographically.  These two pics are of the abdomen and thorax of a greenbottle.  I think I like the first one best, due to its cartoon like quality, but comments are appreciated.  Julian, I hope this is what you meant.  Taken through a light microscope using a Nikon 10xDIC objective with reflected flash light.

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Greenfly giving birth

Posted by wildwatertv on June 15, 2010

Now this is a touching and tender scene for anyone who isn’t a gardener.  It’s a greenfly giving birth to one of many daughters on a rosebud. Within ten minutes there were several of these little beasts running around their mother.  She, meanwhile, just sat there eating throughout.  Taken using a zeiss luminar 25mm lens with the usual flash arrangement which picks up the colours being diffracted by the wings.  When I last looked, mother and daughter were doing well….

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House Fly’s mouth

Posted by wildwatertv on June 8, 2010

This creature is the common house fly, musca domestica. When you see them sitting on a piece of bread they are using that fearsome mouth to scrape and suck food from the bread, cheese, or anything else they might like…  It excretes a sort of liquid enzyme which digests the food on the surface before sucking the pre-digested liquid up though the tube.  These mouth-parts are always a bit grubby.  Pays to keep them off your food in the first place.  Now I’ve seen one up close I think I’ll be more careful.

Taken through a light microscope with a Nikon x10DIC .25 objective and stacked using a stack of thirty-four images.

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More eyes

Posted by wildwatertv on June 3, 2010


Sometimes you take a picture which makes you want to throw everything else you’ve ever done away and just simply admire the majesty of nature.  I’ve posted a blow-up of the central portion of this picture to show the perfection that exists on such a small scale.  Taken through a light microscope using a Nikon DI 10x objective and using a stack of fifty images, this is a different sort of hoverfly to the one below.  This one is called Eupeodes corollae.  One of the most common flies in the garden this time of year.  Wonderful creature!

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Hover Fly eyes

Posted by wildwatertv on May 28, 2010

This beast is the common hoverfly, Melascaeava cinctella.  It has excellent vision, and extremely well developed compound eyes.  This photograph also shows the three small simple eyes, or ocelli, arranged in a triangle between the two enormous compound eyes.  Photographic image stack using a Zeiss Luminar 25mm on a standard light microscope.

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Bryony tendril

Posted by wildwatertv on May 12, 2010

This fscinating thing is one of those little green tendrils that plants extend looking for things to hold on to.  They are tightly coiled and extremely highly developed.  This one is from a white bryony plant, and the coils are so evenly spaced they seem to be man-made.  Nature had the curly telephone line long before we did.

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